Theme
2:26am September 22, 2014
sadtrashhobobuckybarnes asked: Hello yes, there is no point to this message except to complain about how people who obviously do not use any other colloquialisms in their speech but use "folks" in sj contexts makes me want to bite off their ears. (I'm sorry for bothering you but you're the only person I know who also gets mad about this.) Also you are wonderful and important. ANYWAY. Continue conquering etc.

arctic-hands:

youneedacat:

nicocoer:

into-the-weeds:

FOLKS

FOLKS

FOLKS

BODIES BODIES BODIES FOLKS FOLKS FOLKS

Y’ALL

LOOK AT ME, TALKING LIKE ONE OF THE PEOPLE

But… I use folks? and y’all? :( 

So do I, and not just in SJ contexts, in fact mostly not in SJ contexts.

What gets me is the people who use “side-eye” as if it’s an SJ jargon word, instead of a specific cultural word used in a specific cultural context that they’re generally not part of and have no comprehension of.  Like people who’ve never heard of side-eye in their life suddenly start saying “I’m side-eyeing that so hard right now.”

What’s wrong with folks?

I’m not sure.  I honestly didn’t see it as an unusual word.  My family uses it all the time?  Especially “my folks” but other uses as well.

2:19am September 22, 2014
2:19am September 22, 2014
gradientlair:

Rest In Peace: Angelia Magnum and Tjhisha Ball
[content note: anti-Blackness and media violence, misogynoir, violence on sex workers] Angelia Magnum (18) and Tjhisha Ball (19) are young Black women from Tampa, sex workers, who were found brutally murdered in Jacksonville. It is devastating to me that the post-mortem media violence (i.e. most of the few media outlets that reported the story are using their old mugshots; but they were murdered; they are the victims in this case) continues for yet more Black people. As I’ve stated before, Black criminals are treated like monsters. Black victims are treated like criminals. This further complicates, in addition to the dehumanization and criminalization of Black bodies, because they are Black women. Black women regularly go missing and at times are killed; our stories are underreported or shaped as “criminal” even when we are victims. We are underreported in our own communities, let alone nationally. This even further complicates because they were sex workers. People are sickeningly complacent or worse, violently accepting/proactive about the violence sex workers face. I’ve seen comments ranging from victim blaming to “well that’s what they get” kinda comments. The criminalization of sex work itself remains a problem. The violence of misogynoir, and anti-Blackness itself is sickening. It is the media as much as it is society itself.
In Black Teen Girls Killed (But Do You Care)? by Jamilah Lemieux on Ebony, she mentioned that some family didn’t like that they were in sex work and feared the violence they’d face.

It isn’t unreasonable to expect for a grieving family to wish that their dead loved one hadn’t worked in the sex industry, one where women are often subject to increased abuse and harassment at the hands of clients, employers and law enforcement alike. Thus, there should be no judgment from any of us about Ball’s lament about her daughter’s work. But what I fear will happen here is a general sentiment among media makers and the public that because these women were sex workers, that their deaths are not cause for outrage and fear.

As she alluded to, I’m not interested in shaming their families while they grieve; whatever fear and/or ignorance about sex work they had, they’re dealing with the repercussions of terrible violence right now. The socialization that makes people engage in victim blaming is ubiquitous. Doesn’t mean they’re not accountable for those views; means I’m not going to write a criticism right now of grieving Black families. However, how people think about sex work, about Black women, about Black people always needs examination and deconstruction. People need to think about why these deaths don’t matter to so many. I am hurt (and terrified really) that these two Black women could not live and thrive as Black sex workers (as strippers, or any other work they did/wanted to do), as Black women, as Black people, without intersecting oppressions and unspeakable violence. They were young Black female sex workers and this does not make their lives any less valuable nor should’ve granted them what some see as a socially acceptable death sentence. I hope the truth—however painful—comes out about what happened to them. They deserved better than to be dumped under an overpass. 

gradientlair:

Rest In Peace: Angelia Magnum and Tjhisha Ball

[content note: anti-Blackness and media violence, misogynoir, violence on sex workers] Angelia Magnum (18) and Tjhisha Ball (19) are young Black women from Tampa, sex workers, who were found brutally murdered in Jacksonville. It is devastating to me that the post-mortem media violence (i.e. most of the few media outlets that reported the story are using their old mugshots; but they were murdered; they are the victims in this case) continues for yet more Black people. As I’ve stated before, Black criminals are treated like monsters. Black victims are treated like criminals. This further complicates, in addition to the dehumanization and criminalization of Black bodies, because they are Black women. Black women regularly go missing and at times are killed; our stories are underreported or shaped as “criminal” even when we are victims. We are underreported in our own communities, let alone nationally. This even further complicates because they were sex workers. People are sickeningly complacent or worse, violently accepting/proactive about the violence sex workers face. I’ve seen comments ranging from victim blaming to “well that’s what they get” kinda comments. The criminalization of sex work itself remains a problem. The violence of misogynoir, and anti-Blackness itself is sickening. It is the media as much as it is society itself.

In Black Teen Girls Killed (But Do You Care)? by Jamilah Lemieux on Ebony, she mentioned that some family didn’t like that they were in sex work and feared the violence they’d face.

It isn’t unreasonable to expect for a grieving family to wish that their dead loved one hadn’t worked in the sex industry, one where women are often subject to increased abuse and harassment at the hands of clients, employers and law enforcement alike. Thus, there should be no judgment from any of us about Ball’s lament about her daughter’s work. But what I fear will happen here is a general sentiment among media makers and the public that because these women were sex workers, that their deaths are not cause for outrage and fear.

As she alluded to, I’m not interested in shaming their families while they grieve; whatever fear and/or ignorance about sex work they had, they’re dealing with the repercussions of terrible violence right now. The socialization that makes people engage in victim blaming is ubiquitous. Doesn’t mean they’re not accountable for those views; means I’m not going to write a criticism right now of grieving Black families. However, how people think about sex work, about Black women, about Black people always needs examination and deconstruction. People need to think about why these deaths don’t matter to so many. I am hurt (and terrified really) that these two Black women could not live and thrive as Black sex workers (as strippers, or any other work they did/wanted to do), as Black women, as Black people, without intersecting oppressions and unspeakable violence. They were young Black female sex workers and this does not make their lives any less valuable nor should’ve granted them what some see as a socially acceptable death sentence. I hope the truth—however painful—comes out about what happened to them. They deserved better than to be dumped under an overpass. 

2:17am September 22, 2014
juicykits:

Cute white flower on these #lithops. Buy #livingstones at JuicyKits.com new Limited shop. #succulents

juicykits:

Cute white flower on these #lithops. Buy #livingstones at JuicyKits.com new Limited shop. #succulents

2:16am September 22, 2014
2:16am September 22, 2014
feliscorvus:

sunnyinwisconsin:

colossaltitan:

calypso53:

one of my favorite things about hiking is when i come across a strange structure deep in the woods and am left to wonder how and why and when



That looks like an Andy Goldsworthy project!

feliscorvus:

sunnyinwisconsin:

colossaltitan:

calypso53:

one of my favorite things about hiking is when i come across a strange structure deep in the woods and am left to wonder how and why and when

That looks like an Andy Goldsworthy project!

2:16am September 22, 2014

lissycposts:

Andy Goldsworthy’s art

2:15am September 22, 2014
libutron:

Living Stones - Conophytum ricardianum
Conophytum ricardianum (Caryophyllales - Aizoaceae) is a species of succulent native to Namibia, commonly referred to as Living Stones (or Pebbles) because of its rounded shape. It grows in cliff-faces in rock crevices forming large clumps.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Mike Keeling | Locality: cultivated (2008)

libutron:

Living Stones - Conophytum ricardianum

Conophytum ricardianum (Caryophyllales - Aizoaceae) is a species of succulent native to Namibia, commonly referred to as Living Stones (or Pebbles) because of its rounded shape. It grows in cliff-faces in rock crevices forming large clumps.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Mike Keeling | Locality: cultivated (2008)

2:13am September 22, 2014

I studied linguistics in college. I'm tired of hearing people say...

  • "You studied linguistics? Language is so fascinating!! Why, did you know the Eskimos have thousands of words for snow?"
  • "English is the hardest and most complex language in the world."
  • "Chinese and Japanese are more complex than English because they have such a big alphabet."
  • "'Irregardless' and 'ain't' are not words."
  • "Educated people have better language skills than uneducated people."
  • "Sign languages are not real languages. Deaf people don't need sign language cause they can just read lips."
  • "French, Spanish, and Italian came from Latin. And so did English."
  • "Children shouldn't go to school with a lot of non-English speaking kids, cause it'll corrupt their English."
  • "My great-grandparents were German, so it'd be easy for me to learn German."
  • "Shakespeare wrote his plays in Old English."<p>Same. It gets old really, really fast.</p>
2:13am September 22, 2014

“I do believe in an everyday sort of magic—the inexplicable connectedness we sometimes experience with places, people, works of art and the like; the eerie appropriateness of moments of synchronicity; the whispered voice, the hidden presence, when we think we’re alone.”

—  Charles de Lint (via apoetreflects)
2:12am September 22, 2014

feliscorvus:

chavisory:

rise-of-mysterion:

Every single person who’s replied to my autism has had “autistic” in their about me section. 

I don’t understand. I’ve never understood that. Why do you want to be defined like that? Why do you want people to know that first instead of what kind of movies you like, or what songs you listen to, or something that’s actually relevant to your personality? Autism is a part of your identity, but it isn’t your identity. 

…because there’s nothing wrong with being autistic, and there’s nothing wrong with being okay with it, and because a lot of people use Tumblr for the purpose of connecting with other autistic people, so being able to easily identify each other is useful?

Because it is, in some ways, kind of a definitional experience?

I dunno, why are you telling other people what their identity is and isn’t and how they should and shouldn’t want to be defined?

IMO, making a point of *not* mentioning I’m autistic (presuming I wasn’t avoiding the subject for safety reasons) would be as weird as making a point of never bringing up the fact that I’m from Connecticut. No, being from CT doesn’t define me *in and of itself* as a person, but it certainly did a heck of a lot to shape my initial impressions of being alive and it’s not something I can ever “remove” from myself. If *other* people want to use my birth state OR my neurotype OR any other single characteristic I have to define me, I figure that’s their problem, not mine.

Exactly.  To me, autistic is just a word that describes me.  Like the fact that I come from the redwoods initially — which defines me quite a lot, actually.  These are things that matter to me, and matter to some other people.  There’s no shame in them.  Why have to hide them unless you want to?

2:07am September 22, 2014

fullyarticulatedgoldskeleton:

Why do people outside of the friends I talk to follow me?

Why?

*pulls shirt over head and hides in it*

I’m not sure if I’m one of the friends you talk to, but I follow you because I like you as a person and I enjoy hearing about your life and your thoughts about things.  And seeing the pictures you reblog.